Update: Daylight Savings Time -> Standard Time (N.America)

Discussion in 'Linux' started by Albertde, Nov 2, 2008.

  1. Albertde

    Albertde

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    The change from Daylight Savings to Standard Time in N. America didn't work. I had to manually adjust the time. This should be automatic: it is in Ubuntu and Windows.
     
    Albertde, Nov 2, 2008
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  2. Albertde

    mzc

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    ubuntu and windows connects to a time server : nist.gov or windows.com

    Linpus did not even add this feature, hence, you really have to update time by yourself.
     
    mzc, Nov 2, 2008
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  3. Albertde

    onlineaddy

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    Really, mine changed all on its own.
     
    onlineaddy, Nov 3, 2008
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  4. Albertde

    Brian10161

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    Hmm, my palm pilot updates its time without needing an internet connection.

    Most modern software changes the time at a specified day of the month, it doesn't have to have an internet connection to maintain the time.

    The software just doesn't include an automatic changeover option I guess. It might be hidden.
     
    Brian10161, Nov 3, 2008
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  5. Albertde

    Chicago_Jake

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    I couldn't find any option for DST on my Linpus machine. Had to change it myself. But that's cool; I drive a stick-shift car, too.......Jake
     
    Chicago_Jake, Nov 3, 2008
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  6. Albertde

    fweigel

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    Linpus fully supports timezones. Note that the rules for daylight time etc. change according to which timezone you are in. Also, the rules CHANGE, so converting from Universal Coordinated to local can be tricky (you need the timezone data, including any corrections for the full time covered by any time calculations).

    In any case, you will find the rule files in /usr/share/zoneinfo. There are 1674 time zones supported (on my AAO). FYI: to find this out:

    $ cd /usr/share/zoneinfo
    $ find . -type f | wc -l
    1674

    The current timezone is in /etc/timezone

    $ cat /etc/timezone
    America/Toronto

    $ sudo mousepad /etc/timezone

    to edit this file. Note that if (when) timezone rules change (eg. Bush changed DST rules in the US -- and they changed throughout NAFTA as a result), the timezone file is corrected. Its a standard format.

    The date command will also print out what the effective timezone is:

    $ date
    Wed Nov 12 16:39:49 EST 2008

    is my output, showing that the system indeed thinks that EST (Eastern Standard Time, aka America/Toronto) is in effect. I don't have a second AAO (and I am actually using mine, thanks), but I imagine (guess) that the default timezone is "Factory" and that appears to have no corrections at all. The next time I actually reboot, I will try this out...

    Another fun command is zdump, which tells you the time in different zones:

    $ zdump EST CET UTC
    EST Wed Nov 12 16:46:54 2008 EST
    CET Wed Nov 12 22:46:54 2008 CET
    UTC Wed Nov 12 21:46:54 2008 UTC
     
    fweigel, Nov 12, 2008
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  7. Albertde

    RockDoctor

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    Have you got the ntp daemon installed and running? To install:
    Code:
     sudo yum install ntp
    May need to ensure that it runs at boot:
    Code:
     sudo /sbin/chkconfig --levels 345 ntpd on
     
    RockDoctor, Nov 12, 2008
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  8. Albertde

    fweigel

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    Rockdoctor

    chkconfig (the normal sysv/redhat startup mechanism) is not really supported with the AAO. Reason is (I suspect) to reduce boot-time.

    /etc/rc.local can be used, or have a look at /etc/rc.d/slim/wait.sh and /etc/rc.d/slim/nowait.sh. The OS for the AAO seems to have "pulled in" some BSD startup stuff (from Slackware).
     
    fweigel, Nov 13, 2008
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