How to: Replacing Linux with Open SuSe

Discussion in 'Linux' started by LordBane, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. LordBane

    LordBane

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    Hello,

    I want to buy an Acer Aspire One 150L, but after that I would like to replace Linux Linpus by Open SuSe, a friend recommended me to do this, because SuSe is apparently easier to handle for a former windows user like me (ok, ok, I know; with a little bit of work I also could handle Linux easily, but there are also some other reasons, why I would like to use Open SuSe).

    So how does (will) it work? I am thankfull for any help!

    Kind regards
    LordBane
     
    LordBane, Dec 2, 2008
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  2. LordBane

    Ausweider

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    will it work, yes
    without quircks, no
    will you be happy after weeks of twiddeling cause you aint got no experience whatsoever with linux, who knows
     
    Ausweider, Dec 3, 2008
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  3. LordBane

    LordBane

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    Okok, enough irony. :mrgreen:

    The point is: Next year in Germany we will get a new law, the so called BKA(BundesKriminalAmt, similar to the FBI in the US)-Gesetz.

    I am a normal citizen and I dont plan anything bad BUT I am really pi**ed off by our politicians, who try to sneak in every corner of our life by these kind of laws!!!! :evil:

    And so I want to use a new system other than windows to cut through their plan of "computer observation", so it is called.

    And by the way, yes, maybe the first few weeks I will be frustrated, because Linux is so different than windows, but with a little help called "handbook for OpenSuSe" I think I will manage it. :p

    Regards.
     
    LordBane, Dec 4, 2008
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  4. LordBane

    Andysan

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    I recommend that you try Ubuntu 8.10 - it's widely considered to be the best "average" distro of choice, i.e. it's generally the most popular on distrowatch and you'll have more support fro specific AAO problems as so many people here use it.

    I am happy to help, but may i ask how competent a computater you are, i.e can you do any of the following:

    1. Download an ISO.
    2. Make a bootable thumb drive from it.
    3. Change BIOS to boot from thumb drive and boot into Live environment.
    4. Install OS via grpahical installer.
    5. Run tweaks from the command line to fix minor issues.

    Don't worry if none of that makes any sense, it's not all that difficult. :)
     
    Andysan, Dec 5, 2008
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  5. LordBane

    LordBane

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    Well, I understand, what you want me to tell with these steps and yes, I think, I can make a difference between bits and bytes, so much about my competence, but thanks for asking. :mrgreen:

    Its just that I have never ever worked with Linux before, I only know Windows from my childhood days on, so all what I am asking about Linux is because of my incredible lack of knowledge only about Linux. ;)
     
    LordBane, Dec 5, 2008
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  6. LordBane

    Andysan

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    The bottom line regarding Linux is as follows in my opinion:

    On the face of it, Linux isn't a whole lot different to Windows. You click on Icons to launch applications, you can browse the web and check your email in a similar way to how you would on XP or Vista.

    What differs most is the system administration. Under the skin, Linux and Windows are very different, making things such as installing software sharing files between your Aspire and your Windows PC different - not necessarily more difficult, just different. This can take some getting used to.

    Also, companies are usually more reluctant to offer drivers for Linux, so setting up printers etc... is usually more of a headache. But Linux is a smarter OS - it doesnt require anti-virus software, and is much more customizable than Windows. You also have the freedom of choice - there are hundreds of Linux distributions out there, in different colours, shapes and sizes. Windows however, is just Windows.

    What I want to enforce is that most users new to Linux only seem to get into a mess when carrying out administrative tasks. Hence ,if you want the best experience and aren't afraid of change or learning something new go for Linux. If you don't want the hassle of trying to learn a new OS, go for Windows. If you simply just want to turn it on, browse the web/email/documents and do not much else, then go for Linux. Just don't go at it thinking it will be identical to Windows, in the background it is different. You should be confident in editing config files and using the command line.

    Any questions about One's or Linux, feel free to PM me or post here and I'll endeavour to help out.
     
    Andysan, Dec 5, 2008
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  7. LordBane

    LordBane

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    Ok, thank you very much for the advice. Definitly I want to learn more about a new OS, thats one of the reasons, why I will change from Windows to Linux. I found a nice quote, that says all: "Windows is like you are driving around in a nice car with a chauffeur. Linux gives you the keys for the car in your own hands!" :D

    Well, if I habe a question, I will contact you for sure. Thanks again.

    Can be closed.
     
    LordBane, Dec 6, 2008
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