Has anyone had a SSD die on you? And HDD?

Discussion in 'Storage' started by Vash, Jul 8, 2016.

  1. Vash

    Vash

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    For me, nope, not yet. And I hope not. I have total 3 SSD in procession at this moment. A 128GB, a 256GB, and a 512GB. The two smaller ones are in the computers as primary hard drive right now, and the 512GB is used as an external hard drive at this moment to store my files.

    On the other hand, I have had two external HDD died on me. One to water damage from the air conditioning, the other just died a few months after purchase and took all my files with it.

    So what is your experience with SSD and HDD?
     
    Vash, Jul 8, 2016
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  2. Vash

    Corzhens

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    We bought an HDD some years ago for our archiving storage. But that 500 GB (I wouldn't mention the brand) would be so hot after running for a few minutes. I brought it back to the vendor whom I know personally. She took the overheating hard disk and had their tech checked it. When she came back to me, she had 2 HDDs, the old one and the replacement which she gave to me, both hard disks. I was advised that the overheating hard disk is still okay to be used but only on a temporary basis for it might break down without notice. Until now I still have it although it's been more than a year when I last tested it.
     
    Corzhens, Jul 10, 2016
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  3. Vash

    Fuzyon

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    I've only bought a handful of SSDs and I currently use two 128GB ones, they're 2 years old but they're going really strong and there are no hiccups, I think it's one of the smartest purchases for computer performance enhancement. As for HDDs... many died on me, sometimes I bought cheap brands but I've even had some from WD and Seagate that crapped out after a while. SSDs have a lower chance of dying.
     
    Fuzyon, Jul 10, 2016
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  4. Vash

    nytegeek

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    Nope. I have drives are older IDE (not SATA) that by all rights should have died 5 or more years ago. They aren't in production. They are used for duplicate backups. They get checked for bad clusters on a schedule, nothing has been found yet.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2016
    nytegeek, Jul 10, 2016
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  5. Vash

    IBMPC8088

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    Fortunately thus far, I haven't had any SSD drives die on me yet. I did have one that had a hiccup or two, but that's only because the virtual msdos partition used for vfat was messed with and had to be reset/redone for a windows install for someone. Other than that, all the SSD drives I've used since the middle to late 2000's have been fine, and even some of the early solid state drives in the 90's for embedded projects are still working just fine.

    I have had magnetic drives die on me; mostly on laptops or external drives that got bumped or moved around a lot. Rarely desktop drives (unless the computer was bumped, moved, or electrical short). That being said, I have had magnetic drives fail under a short period of time, but it may be my own fault. I was trying to do tests and experiments with a file system that used up the entire drive. It may have been writing and reading too heavily for what it expected a normal user to do and a normal file system to work like, and after a couple of months doing that, it wore out the heads or did something to the drive that it shouldn't have done. A few of them were recoverable after that, but many had issues writing to the drive, even if reading was still possible. Most of these were 5400rpm 2.5" laptop drives that had this issue...not as much with 7200 and 10,000 rpm drives.

    Another fatcor to consider is that some of the magnetic drives that didn't make it very long had been subjected to higher than normal heat and humidity that other drives normally are not.

    If you don't try to overdo it or over-exercise the heads and platters of a magnetic drive, it will usually last as long as it's supposed to or longer by its rating. Thus far, SSD drives are working out. There may be something that can do that to them, or wear out the cells faster than normal...but outside of excessive reads and writes to the exact same area which is normally hard to do because of wear-leveling, I haven't found that just yet.

    But thus far, out of a few dozen systems, all the SSDs are good to go, and most of the magnetic drives (when used properly) are ok too when secured and taken care of on a laptop, or not bumped about when used with an enclosure or external drive.
     
    IBMPC8088, Jul 10, 2016
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  6. Vash

    joshposh

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    Over the course of 15 years I've had several hard drives fail on me. It was due to age. The most I expect out of a hard drive is 5 years. So if it's 4 years and some months, it's tome to go shopping for some replacements drives. Solid State Drives are still relatively new compared to Hard Disk Drives. So far my lone computer with a SSD is working just fine and it has been about 3 years now with no issues. We'll see what happens in 2 years or so. My fingers are crossed.
     
    joshposh, Jul 10, 2016
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  7. Vash

    LGNPanda

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    If you count dropping a 1TB HDD, I guess
     
    LGNPanda, Jul 22, 2016
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  8. Vash

    hades_leae

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    I have never heard about an SSD going out actually. This is my first time, and I've never thought about it. HDD, yes all the time. I have my desktop HDD burn out, I guess it was because of the heat, I didn't used to care for my computers like I do now, I thought they were supposed to eventually go out, so I let them do their thing.

    ff my SSD goes out in my laptop, I don't know what I'll do. I'm not creating backups right now.
     
    hades_leae, Jul 22, 2016
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  9. Vash

    Vash

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    SSD has no moving parts. So it is harder for it to be malfunction. And then, SSD is also much newer than HDD. So all SSD currently in use are not that old compare to HDD. One thing for sure though, SSD will eventually stop working. It is just the matter of time. All things will perish.



     
    Vash, Aug 1, 2016
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