AAO does not charge, does not run off AC.

Discussion in 'Laptop Hardware' started by Condukt365, Nov 15, 2009.

  1. Condukt365

    Condukt365

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    I was using my AAO with a very low battery one night until Windows alerted me to charge it.

    I put it in hibernate and left it alone, I was not able to get it on the charger until the next day.

    Next day it was completely discharged, obviously because the battery kicked the bucket.

    I plugged the adapter it and the orange light did not come on.

    I let it be for several hours and the light still did not come on.

    I removed the battery and left the adapter plugged in, it does not turn on with the adapter plugged in either.

    The adapter is not the problem, I tested it on a friend's AAO.

    Is it completely dead? Can it just happen randomly like this?
     
    Condukt365, Nov 15, 2009
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  2. Condukt365

    loweb1

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    I'm having this exact same problem!

    It won't run off of AC power at all. One day last week when my battery was getting low (about 10%) I plugged it into the wall charger but this time it didn't charge. I thought maybe my charger went bad but I tried with my friends charger (he's also got an AAO) and that didn't work either.

    Now my battery is completely dead and I can't get it to power on at all.

    Have you had any luck with yours? Anyone else have some idea's?
     
    loweb1, Nov 30, 2009
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  3. Condukt365

    andypop481

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    Exact same problem as well. I put the computer to sleep and later that night it did not respond when I plugged in the wall charger. The light didn't come on and Windows kept me on battery power. There are a few recommended things to try at the ACER website (like removing the battery, unplugging the AC cord, and holding down the power button for 2 minutes) but that did nothing. I've been at class all day and haven't yet been able to get back and test a different charging cable, but looks like it may not even be that. One site suggested updating the BiOS but then made it clear to do it ONLY for the older models, I have an Aspire One 250 so I don't know what to do about it.
     
    andypop481, Dec 3, 2009
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  4. Condukt365

    gonediesel

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    This sounds like my issue also. Any suggestions?
     
    gonediesel, May 22, 2011
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  5. Condukt365

    Sudsmcduff96

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    Seems like a BIOS issue to me. Is your Aspire One able to turn on?
     
    Sudsmcduff96, May 23, 2011
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  6. Condukt365

    justfride

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    having the same issue with mine is a aod150 and went to plug it in when the low bat pop up I plugged it in and nothing, no orange light showimg it's recharging and doesn't run off the ac power? need help bad.
     
    justfride, May 24, 2011
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  7. Condukt365

    Swarvey Moderator

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    I have in the past, had a similar problem. It turned out to be the AC lead at fault. If you have a multimeter that reads DC, you can easily and safely check the output voltage of the AC plug and match the multimeters readings against the rated input voltage, printed on the underside of your AAO. Check your AC lead as follows:

    * Plug the AC lead into the wall so it is live.
    * Take your multimeter and ensure it is set to read DC voltage
    * For the next two steps, be sure to NOT touch both leads together, you do not want to short out the AC lead and kill it (if it isn't already dead)
    * Take the negative (black) pin of your multimeters probe and insert it into the hole in the center of the AC lead's adapter (at the AAO end of the lead)
    * Take the positive (red) pin of you multimeters probe and touch it to the outer jacket of the AC lead adapter.

    Your multimeter should be reading some form of voltage being output by the AC lead. As an example, the sticker on the underside of my AAO D250 states that the AAO requires 19v DC at 1.58amps. Your multimeter shoud read no less than the voltage stated on the sticker, but sometimes a few volts over.

    If your meter cannot get an adequate reading from the AC lead, then the AC lead is dead, will not charge your battery, and will not operate the AAO without a battery.

    If you don't have a multimeter, or simply don't know how to use one, you could borrow somone elses AAO AC lead (checking the input voltage for your AAO and the output voltage of the borrowed AC lead) and see if your machine starts up again.

    I was shocked that my first AC lead only lasted a year (no longer than my first AAO), but it has happened before, the leads can die without warning.
     
    Swarvey, May 25, 2011
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  8. Condukt365

    justfride

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    used a mulimeter to check things and it had 19.4, after a few days I plugged it in and it all worked? think it was some type of static problem since I moved into my new place I'm getting shocked all the time I do use a surged protecter but does that work when the ac is already plugged into it? I know it's designed to work the other way.
     
    justfride, May 28, 2011
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  9. Condukt365

    Jenovacaine

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    I've been having a very similar problem with my AOD250. Sounds like a lot of other people have as well. Maybe that's a bit of a weak point with this line.

    Anyway, I suspected the DC jack was bad, so I ordered a new one and swapped it out. That worked for like two days - somewhat. My girlfriend did the actual swap (she's much better at getting the keyboard off than I am) and she got it working fine when she replaced the component. She charged up my battery, and the next day I took it home. However, when I got it home it wouldn't charge.

    The next day, I opened it up to take a look to see if maybe the jack's connection to the motherboard came loose or something. Everything looked fine as far as I could see, so I got a voltage tester to try and see where the problem was. The tester wasn't of any use, as it didn't seem to be able to pick up any current from the adapter (which I know works fine), but when I tried plugging the laptop in again, I got a charge! However, the revelry was short-lived, as I soon found that the laptop only charged if the adapter was in a certain position - if I so much as bumped the laptop, it could lose the charge. Not having a battery in was out of the question. And then over the next day or so, the problem just deteriorated to where I started - no charge, no matter how I moved the adapter around.

    Also of note was that when I got the computer back, plugging the adapter in felt very stiff. Later on, when it got to where it wouldn't charge at all, I found that the jack had a little wiggle in it just like the previous one that went bad did. Right now I suspect that the inside bracket that holds the jack in place is damaged, and thus when I plug in the adapter, it's causing the jack to wiggle about and maybe pinching the wires inside and possibly causing them to break. I really don't know, though. This has been a problem for almost a month now, and I'm about ready to give up and just buy a new computer. Does anyone have any suggestions other than the multimeter? Like I said, the one I have doesn't seem to work for whatever reason.
     
    Jenovacaine, Jun 3, 2011
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  10. Condukt365

    Swarvey Moderator

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    Multimeters rarely if ever fail. Get a 9v battery from the local cheapie shop and see if you can get a reading on the multimeter from that. If it fails to read any voltage, pop the rear cover off your multimeter and swap out the 9v battery that's already in it, with the one you just bought to test. If you still don't get a reading from the AC lead then you're either connecting the meter to the lead wrong, or the meter you got came with the cheapest of cheap probes and there's a break in the line. The cheap $10 meters aren't worth much, the hard wired probe leads are prone to failure, even though the meter itself works fine.

    The AC adapter should be a snug fit in the socket of the AAO. I recently had a wiggle in mine, but that was due to the socket not being glued to the inside of the case properly. A dab of hot glue stuck it down nice and firm. The inside of the case is painted with a (copper based?) metalic paint to ensure all components ground properly. I wedged some alluminium foil in between the negative side of the socket and the squarish part of the case it is installed to. This ensures that the AC socket inside the case is both firmly attached (with the hot glue) and firmly grounding to the metallic paint (with the alluminium foil) Be very careful if you attempt this, you don't want to create a short circuit anywhere.

    If your AC lead is functoning properly (tested with a working multimeter), the AC socket is firmly attached and earthed to the inside of the case and the wires leading from the socket to the mainboard have no visible breaks, that leaves only the mainboard or the battery as a problem. This is where you should be plugging it in to AC power without the battery installed. If it doesn't power on and run properly without the battery, then chances are you have either one of the following:

    * A dud BIOS that needs a blind flash to get it working (this can't be done unless the machine at least powers up, so it's unlikely that this is the case)
    * A dud mainboard that needs replacing (hopefully you didn't open the machine inside the warranty period as Acer will have to replace it, if you're outside of warranty then it's onto eBay for a replacement)

    My D250 (as much as I've completely disassembled it probably 20 or 30 times) has proven to be far more stable than my old white 150 series. I have yet to have a dead BIOS (so I haven't had to blind flash) nor have any other components failed. My original hard drive died, but that was because my cat knocked it off a shelf to the floor while it was running. Yet it still operates fine. The AC lead that originally failed on me was left over from my older machine. I didn't see the sense in unpacking the new one until the older one had failed.
     
    Swarvey, Jun 3, 2011
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